Black Ice developer Garrett Cooper Internet Sit-down

Black Ice developer Garrett Cooper Internet Sit-down

For those who have frequented my YouTube channel, you may have seen my recent Let's Play with Black Ice developer Garrett Cooper, A.K.A. superdupergc. Garrett was also kind enough to sit down with me without the distraction of laz guns, web crawlers, and The Shark, so that we could discuss Black Ice uninterrupted by my penchant for anarchy and chat about his Indie game development experiences.

Garrett is a man of passion. He is in the enviable position of being able to 1) envision his ideal game 2) actually be able to make it. Charismatic and sociable, he works diligently and patiently to share his love with others so that they, too, can whittle away hours while blasting away foes.

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Social Justice Warrior developer Eric Ford Internet Sit-down

Social Justice Warrior developer Eric Ford Internet Sit-down

There are very few issues around which everyone in the world can agree. The more personal a topic becomes the less likely that one will concede their vested interest in the name of polite debate and mature discourse. 

Introduce the optimistic Eric Ford A.K.A Nonadecimal who gives humanity more credit than most. I spoke with him about a recent project he launched called Social Justice Warriors, a project which seemed to elicit a lot of feedback from several communities. Not only were gamers engaged, but other indirect groups as well. One of his original goals was to shine a light on those that operate in the figurative shadows of ignorance and the faceless void we call the Internet. His aim is admirable and regardless of whether or not it will ultimately affect change he has my utmost respect for being brave enough to try.

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Paragon Infinite developer Mike Lasch Internet Sit-down

Paragon Infinite developer Mike Lasch Internet Sit-down

I recently sat down with Mike Lasch, creator of Paragon and Paragon Infinite, to get a good idea of the solo-Indie development landscape and see where his individual path has taken him. Warm and jovial, he is easy going and deeply dedicated to making gamers happy through his creations. It is somewhat difficult to find genuine concern for the player and the love of creating, but Mike has this quality.

His story is not an unusual one but that does not depreciate its importance: a man setting out into the world to program and code as his whims take him. He has participated in game jams such as Ludum Dare, fundraising events such as A Bundle of Love for Brandon, and works diligently to integrate into the wide community of game dev.

Let's see where our conversation takes us.

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Spacebase DF-9 Take Two: On to Greener Pastures

What more can be said about Spacebase DF-9? We're going to take another stab at it and hope that our space-going simulants fare better this time around. Episodes one and two are up for viewing!

Episode One:

Cameron returns to the world of Spacebase DF-9 to see how much longer we can have a functional base in space. Still in Alpha, still punishing. More from the awesome folks at Double Fine can be found here.

Episode Two:

Everyone is still alive for the moment, at least. Let's see how long we can keep all systems functional and casualties to a minimum! More from the awesome folks at Double Fine can be found here. http://www.spacebasedf9.com/buy/ For words that do not necessarily pertain to video games, visit http://www.herearewords.com/

Paragon or: How to Not Forget Our Roots and Play the Original.

Previously, we played Paragon Infinite, the arcade reimagining of the original game Paragon. Our eyes fall to this progressive puzzler and equally timing-reliant game experience.

Paragon (from now on referred to as Paragon: Prime because it sounds cool) "enjoyed" an extended, 3-year-long development cycle at the hands of Mike Lasch. I imagine this is due to the difficulty in crafting a challenging game that forces you to learn the layout of each level and failing multiple times before being successful.

Let me explain. If you happened to watch how Paragon Infinite plays, then you should be loosely familiar. For those who haven't (go watch!), I described it thusly, "collect gems and guide a ball through barriers as it bounces up and down a filament-like strand before being released forward as it is chased by an ever approaching kill barrier." Even in the context of Infinite, that doesn't make much sense. Prime still has gem collecting and the filament action where the ball follows a rail and . Infinite measures progress simply as a numerically-based score with no end goal. Prime uses gem collection sort of like a checkpoint where they all need to be collected in order to complete a level. Score is determined, golf-style, by the number of times a ball reaches the end of a rail and bounces back. Fewer bounces means a better rating and score.